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Bible- 4 Credits

Students are required to take 4 credits of Bible to graduate from Abundant Life Christian School.  Transfer students will be grandfathered in to this requirement.

Students learn the basic stories of the Old and New Testaments. They discover what they tell us about who God is, who we are as humans and what they teach us about our relationship with God. The first semester is typically spent in the Old Testament and the second semester is spent in the New Testament. Class activities include Bible reading, weekly videos covering the basic themes and concepts of each book of the Bible, essays communicating student learning and opinions on each book covered.

This class is an introduction to apologetics. The goal is to become better equipped to give an answer for the hope that we have in Christ (1 Pet. 3:15). Additionally, it is anticipated that the student's own faith will be strengthened as we explore positive reasons for belief. The first semester deals with the historicity of Jesus, reasons to believe in the resurrection, religious pluralism, reliability of the scriptures, good tactics to use while sharing our faith, and other relevant topics. The second semester deals with scientific reasons to believe in God. We explore discoveries that point to a Creator and discuss ways in which Christians have wed scientific findings with the creation accounts in the Bible.

Eleventh-grade Bible focuses on one thing: growing together while moving in God's direction. To accomplish this, we learn about relationships, Romans, and worldview. Regarding relationships, we explore patterns and styles of communication and relationships in order to better understand ourselves and the communities we create. Our work with the Book of Romans is done by studying the text deeply. We then also explore issues of theological importance to understand the breadth of Paul's epistle. Finally, we work to develop an understanding of our own personal worldviews and the way that our worldview has been shaped and formed by history and culture. 

It is an examination of various worldviews & religions from a Christian perspective. Special attention is given to helping students understand what it means to embrace a Christian worldview. Students are challenged to be able to explain not only what they believe, but why they believe it. As the course examines other worldviews, the students focus on how our foundational presuppositions shape our lifestyle choices, beliefs, and answers to life’s major questions such as “Where did I come from?,” “Where am I going?,” and “What is the meaning of life?” The second semester provides an overview of the major religions and sects stemming from these worldviews. Students should recognize how these religions function in the context of the cultures that they are part of. More importantly, students should gain a heart to pray for people with differing backgrounds and play a part in the effort to reach them for Christ. In essence, this course is an aid to preparation for life after high school; because students will be confronted throughout life with individuals who hold radically different ideas from their own, this course will equip them to respond biblically while choosing to live out their faith in every aspect of their daily lives.

Social Studies- 4 Credits

In this course, students learn the structure and purpose of the U.S. government so that they can become informed and engaged citizens. The first semester focuses on the three branches of the federal government, and the second semester dives deeper into specific policies and the role of citizens in the political process. While students will be tested on content, most units will also have a research project or simulation component. Students also evaluate and discuss various perspectives on current events and political issues.

This course offers college level of difficulty and sophistication in the study of government and politics in the United States. Coursework prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in U.S. Government & Politics administered by the College Board in May. There is an additional fee to take the exam. Most colleges and universities will issue college credit to those students scoring above a pre-determined level on the A.P. exam. Homework commitment time exceeds the High School norm and is commensurate with college level coursework.

This course provides an overview of the history of human civilization from ancient Sumer to the start of the 21st century. The focus is on the development of western civilization and culture that will hopefully excite the imagination while helping students to develop critical thinking skills.

“In AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time” (College Board). The coursework prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in European History administered by the College Board in May. There is an additional fee to take the exam. Most colleges and universities will issue college credit to those students scoring above a predetermined level on the AP exam. The homework commitment time exceeds the high school norm and is commensurate with college level coursework.

U.S. History covers the nation’s history from 1800 to the present. Students learn about the major people, events, and movements that have shaped American history, including the history of the church in America. This course emphasizes both content knowledge and historical skills. Students enter into the historian’s work of reconstructing the past by engaging with primary and secondary documents and communicate their historical understanding both orally and in writing. 

This course offers college level of difficulty and sophistication in the study of U.S. History. The primary purpose of this course is to enable the committed student to learn, appreciate, analyze, reflect upon and write well about America’s past. Study focuses on the political, diplomatic, economic, intellectual and cultural history of the United States from the colonial era to the present. Coursework prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in American History administered by the College Board in May. There is an additional fee to take the exam. Most colleges and universities will issue college credit to those students scoring above a pre-determined level on the A.P. exam. Homework commitment time exceeds the High School norm and is commensurate with college level coursework.

This one semester course examines how human behavior is influenced by our membership in groups and society as a whole by looking at how humans are socialized and culture is transmitted from one generation to the next. Special attention is paid to examining significant social issues from a biblical perspective including marriage and family, sex roles, social status, race relations and poverty/wealth, among others.

This one semester course is an orderly investigation of psychological concepts and their applications in light of biblical truth regarding human nature. The course primarily focuses on insight into human nature. Some of the topics covered include the origins of personality, the nature of learning/thinking, motivation and emotions, and dealing with stress and frustration.

What does it take to live in a complex and increasingly interdependent global society? It takes knowledge and skills that help you understand the people in this world God has created, their environments and issues. We will divide our time primarily between looking at political and cultural geography and in wrestling with issues that affect our global communities like wealth/poverty, food, energy, environment, and technology. This one semester course fulfills the geography academic standard.

Using the curriculum provided by Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance, we will cover a variety of very practical issues that students will need to know about to make wise choices both now and in the future. Topics include: budgeting, saving, investing, consumer awareness, shopping, insurance, career choices, real estate, and giving. This is a one semester course.

English- 4 Credits

In this basic-level English course, students learn foundational skills in the areas of literature analysis, numerous writing forms, grammar, usage, mechanics, and vocabulary comprehension. Students employ their knowledge through literature discussion and essay writing. Students learn to compare and contrast literary themes with biblical values.

This semester-long class is designed to provide students with basic public speaking skills as well as an in-depth understanding of the process of effective communication. Students will be exposed to a variety of rhetorical techniques as well as logical fallacies. The goal of the class is to prepare students for public speaking and communication in the modern age.

This semester-long class incorporates literature into the study of major areas of writing disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the six traits of writing as well as developing mechanics, usage, and grammar skills for writing. 

Students read and analyze American literature from Puritan to contemporary times. The study and discussion of various literary works enables students to consider universal themes and strengthen their biblical perspective of these themes. Students read many different forms of literature, such as poetry, autobiography, satire, and novels, and they also have opportunities to practice writing in many of these forms. In addition to the literary and writing components, students also continue to expand their vocabulary and hone their grammar skills.

This course offers college-level difficulty and sophistication in the study of literature and composition. The A.P. English course in Literature and Composition engages students in careful reading and critical analysis of literature. Structure, style, themes, figurative language, imagery, symbolism, literary devices and tone of literary works are examined and discussed. Composition work emphasizes students’ ability to explain clearly, cogently, and elegantly an understanding and interpretation of literary works through the prism of a biblical worldview. The A.P. Literature exam is offered by the College Board in May; an additional fee is charged to take this exam. Many colleges and universities will issue college credit to those students scoring above a pre-determined level on the A.P. exam. Students should expect a more rigorous homework schedule and college-level coursework.

In this upper-level English course, students read, analyze, and interpret British literature from Anglo-Saxon to contemporary times. The study and discussion of various literary works enables students to interpret universal themes and struggles, and to develop a biblical perspective of these themes and struggles. Students also use literature to practice creative and critical thinking skills. These skills are then demonstrated through a variety of classroom activities and assignments, including essay writing, discussion, and testing.

Mathematics- 3 Credits

*Math tracks will be determined by placement tests prior to ninth grade. Incoming students will be assessed based on report card/transcript assessment and testing, if needed.

This course develops students’ basic math skills and introduces key algebra concepts. A calculator may not be used in the first semester.

This course focuses on algebra concepts such as solving equations, graphing, factoring, and working with polynomials.

(Prerequisite: Algebra I). While using a hands-on, inductive approach to learning, students learn truths found in planar and solid geometry. Significant time is also spent growing students’ ability to think logically.

(Prerequisite: Geometry). This course reviews Algebra 1 concepts and delves deeper into more advanced algebra concepts such as radicals, quadratic equations, and conics. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

(Prerequisite: Algebra 2). During the first semester, we study Trigonometry by expanding our understanding of functions, sines, cosines, and tangents. During the second semester, we explore assorted other advanced math topics such as polar graphs, probability, and more. The semester ends with an introduction to Calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

(Prerequisite: Advanced Math with a minimum grade of “B”) Calculus is the study of four main concepts: limits, derivatives, indefinite integrals and definite integrals. Student learn to analyze these concepts numerically, algebraically, verbally and graphically. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required for each student. This course is equivalent to a first semester college calculus class, and students who pass the College Board AP Calculus Exam in May are eligible to receive college credit from most colleges and universities. There is an additional fee to take the exam. Acceptance into this A.P. course is subject to instructor approval. Homework commitment time exceeds the High School norm and is commensurate with college level coursework.

Science- 3 Credits

Physical science is an overview of both chemistry and physics. The first half of the course covers the chemistry of matter. The second half covers the physics of matter. Concepts are explored during classroom discussions and demonstrations. There is an emphasis on hands-on learning with many student laboratory experiments taking place.

(Prerequisite: Algebra I). This course is a survey of living organisms as they were discovered by naturalists. It includes studies in cell biology, genetics, and human anatomy and physiology. Studies in botany and zoology are also briefly covered.

(Prerequisite: Biology). In this course we explore the language of reading, writing, and speaking about the tiny world of atoms and all they do. We also learn how to predict and calculate quantities involving chemical substances. We learn how God has organized and arranged everything we can see. We add demonstrations and hands-on experiments to help make our concepts and discussions real. 

(Prerequisite: Enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher level of math). Physics involves the study of motion, the effect of forces, and various forms of energy, such as heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. Involved in the study of most chapters are practice problems and hands-on laboratory explorations. The mastery of physical laws is fundamental to all sciences and satisfies a natural curiosity for a deeper understanding of God’s creation.

(Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology OR Biology and Chemistry). Students extensively explore how God has intricately designed each system of the human body. Students learn the names and locations of the larger structures in each system (gross anatomy), what the cells in each system look like (micro-anatomy), and how these structures function to support life (physiology). Content is delivered via lectures, labs, dissections, and detailed coloring/drawing. Clinical correlations and case studies are also incorporated to discover what happens when these systems fail to function properly. 

(Prerequisites: Chemistry and Physics with a minimum grade of “B”). This course takes our prior understanding of Physics and Chemistry and goes farther and deeper. Students explore their own scientific interests in independent research projects of their own choosing. Additionally, we take time to develop an understanding of how to design and perform experiments to solve problems.

Health- .5 credits

Health covers a variety of topics related to maintaining optimal health. It includes an overview of anatomy and physiology, CPR and First Aid, personal safety, disease prevention, drug and alcohol abuse, and relationships. All topics are covered from a biblical perspective.

Physical Education- 1.5 credits

Students are introduced to and practice a variety of indoor and outdoor team sports. Classes engage in "lead-up games" and actual scrimmages of various sports throughout the semester. Following each unit, students are tested on their knowledge of technique and the rules and regulations of these sports. Personal fitness and fundamentals of weight training are covered in the second semester. Non-graded fitness testing is conducted in each semester and tracked from year to year so that students may engage in goal-setting on a year-to-year basis. A total of 1.5 credits of HS Physical Education class, or six semesters, are required for graduation.

Phy Ed Electives (do not meet PE credit requirements)

This elective class meets once a week, and students play a scrimmage of the sport or activity that is being covered in P.E. Competitive sports does not focus on instruction or practicing skills. Instead, this class focuses on fun and competition.

Students learn form for basic free weight and body weight exercises. Each class consists of a 30-minute workout composed of elements of weight lifting, circuit training and high intensity interval training, stretching and cardio.

Electives

Students must have a minimum of 4 elective credits on their transcript to graduate.  Any course exceeding graduation requirements in another department are counted toward electives for graduation purposes. 

Foreign Language

While Foreign Language is not required for graduation, it is often required for college entry.  It is strongly recommended that college-bound students begin taking foreign language in their freshman year to guarantee face-to-face instruction will be available for this elective.

Research shows that language acquisition is an unconscious process that happens naturally when our brains have the opportunity to interact with engaging, comprehensible messages. For this reason, Spanish at ALCS is taught using methods that emphasize proficiency and mastery of the language rather than memorization of vocabulary and grammar rules. Students are immersed in the target language from day one through reading, listening, speaking and writing which provides them with the tools necessary for true language proficiency.

Students are introduced to the Spanish language through storytelling, listening, reading and writing. Emphasis is given to listening and writing through the use of different instructional resources and materials. By the end of this course, students will be able to understand simple texts and communicate basic ideas about themselves, their families and their communities. They will also be able to handle short everyday social interactions and understand the main idea of a message. Students will be expected to meet a level of proficiency that is in accordance to national standards for this level.

(Prerequisite: Spanish 1) Spanish 2 continues to build on the language acquired in Spanish 1 with a greater emphasis on past and future tense. Students continue to learn Spanish through storytelling, listening, reading and writing and will be expected to meet higher standards of language proficiency. Students in Spanish 2 read short novels as part of their weekly work and will begin to speak with ease about topics that are of interest to them. Students will be expected to meet a level of proficiency that is in accordance to national standards for this level.

(Prerequisite: Spanish 2) Spanish 3 builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish 1 and 2. Students are introduced to more complex language structures and different tenses and are expected to use them naturally when writing and speaking. Students continue to learn Spanish through methods that encourage proficiency versus memorization of rules and vocabulary. Some of these methods include reading and discussing novels, watching short films and writing about or discussing them in class, reading about current events, etc. Students will be expected to meet a level of proficiency that is in accordance to national standards for this level.

(Prerequisite: Spanish 3) Spanish 4 is a continuation of Spanish 3. Students continue to become more proficient in the target language by reading longer novels and learning about important social and political issues in Latin America such as civil wars and immigration. Students learn more sophisticated terminology, complex grammatical structures and will be expected to use them in writing and speaking assignments.

Art

This class is structured in a way that supports all art skill levels; learning is diversified to meet and challenge each student. Students engage in an in-depth study of one art medium beginning with an introduction, the production of several art pieces to build skills, and ending with a final project applying all the knowledge gained over the semester. Students are encouraged to express themselves and explore deeper themes such as social justice issues, faith, history, etc. Examples of classes offered include the following: Ceramics, Sculpture, Jewelry and Leather Craft, Printmaking, Painting, Mixed Media, Collage, Mosaics, Weaving, Photography, Carving, Drawing, Observational Drawing, Figure Drawing, Typography & Calligraphy, Paper Arts, Wood Burning, and Community Art.

This course meets once a week. It is an open lab class, meaning that students are doing self-guided learning. Students create goals and projects to develop skills in interests in whatever art medium they choose. Teachers provide materials and guidance as needed. Art club is perfect for students who need more creative outlets or students that just want to do a little art without the structure of a formal class.

(Prerequisite: at least 3 semesters of HS Art, student is a junior or senior) This course is ideal for highly motivated students considering careers in the art field who want to further develop their skills in a specific area or medium that they have already learned at ALCS, or, who want to explore a medium that is not offered, such as digital art. With the guidance and approval of the instructor, students design their own course and assignments. Materials and projects from the independent study usually feature in students’ college portfolios. 

Music

Choir focuses on learning to sing, including both vocal technique (how to use your voice) and music literacy (how to read music). Students prepare music for two concerts per year. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. This class meets 3 times per week.  

**Choir and band are both elective classes.  Except for piano entries, any student wishing to participate in the spring solo/ensemble festival on an individual or small group basis is required to participate in either the band or music program at ALCS.

Band is offered through Overture Band Programs, Inc., a non-profit organization that provides Band programs to private & parochial schools who would otherwise be unable to provide instrumental music instruction to their students. Overture hires state licensed instrumental music teachers to teach in schools it contracts with. Parents pay “band tuition” to Overture to have their children participate in the Band program. Band Teachers provide weekly group band rehearsals and semi-private lessons, teaching students all aspects of playing their instruments. Students participate in two concerts per year, as well as other musical opportunities including Honor Band, Jazz Band, Taste of the Arts, and Solo & Ensemble Festival. Summer Lessons are also available. Parents will need to provide a quality instrument (rented or owned), related supplies & lesson books.

**Choir and band are both elective classes.  Except for piano entries, any student wishing to participate in the spring solo/ensemble festival on an individual or small group basis is required to participate in either the band or music program at ALCS.

Drama

This class meets one day a week. Students may take this class all four years in high school if they desire. Class topics and teachings rotate from semester to semester. The class focuses on introducing the theatre arts and techniques and furthering students’ experience in knowledge in basic acting skills, stage direction, theatre history, and production. Students learn through lecture, theatre games and exercises, class projects and outside observation and performance opportunities.

This class is offered to juniors and seniors who have taken the general drama class for two years. The class meets three days a week for a semester. Topics and teachings are based on student interest and talents and have included topics such as the following: directing, advanced acting, production design, study of acting techniques, study of theatre history. As a more advanced theatre class, this class includes more reading, projects and outside work than the general drama class. This class is often taken by students who want to continue with theatre beyond high school whether that means on an amateur level or pursing theatre as a career.

Computers & Business

This course provides students the opportunity to dramatically affect the finished product of the Abundant Life Christian School yearbook. Students are responsible for all facets of yearbook development and production. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: marketing and fundraising, soliciting donor sponsors, layout and design, employing basic photography skills, meeting deadlines, collaborating on development of theme, surveying and gathering information, generating professional communications, and navigating the Jostens website. This class requires students to have the ability to work independently as well as cooperatively with other students on Yearbook Staff, show initiative, exercise good judgment and self-discipline, be respectful of the lab space, and be self-motivated. In addition to work completed in class, students will be expected to attend various school activities and events outside of classroom hours. This class meets 3 times a week for the entire school year. This class is capped at eight students with priority given to students with previous design experience or success in a publications class.

It is highly likely that your future endeavors will require you to be able to type, use word processors, use presentation software, make fliers or handouts, and keep track of information. We use Microsoft Office products (Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Publisher) and cloud-based analogues (Google-based apps) to create documents of varying complexity. Upon completing this course, you should have greater confidence in knowing which program to use and how to use it to design high-quality documents.

* Our four-course high school computer sequence repeats every two years. Each course aims at different aspects of using computers: business, websites, algorithms & hardware, and computer animation. In addition, independent study options are available.

This class covers the basics of vector-based computer animation tools. We first learn how to create 2-D shapes using vector tools in Adobe Animate. Then we use key-frames, layers, code, and tweens to build more and more complex animations as the semester progresses. *A non-refundable license fee for use of the program will be charged for each student taking the course.

* Our four-course high school computer sequence repeats every two years. Each course aims at different aspects of using computers: business, websites, algorithms & hardware, and computer animation. In addition, independent study options are available.

This class covers a broad range of computer-related topics. We learn the history of computers and explore algorithmic thinking. We also learn about how different computer hardware components work. We explore the basics of programming using an interactive, animated 3-D world that we control.

Our four-course high school computer sequence repeats every two years. Each course aims at different aspects of using computers: business, websites, algorithms & hardware, and computer animation. In addition, independent study options are available.

This class will teach you the basics of making web pages and websites. We’ll learn about HTML, hexadecimal coding, simple CSS and layout options. We will also take time to talk about design theory so that our stories are not just published, but visually pleasing as well.

* Our four-course high school computer sequence repeats every two years. Each course aims at different aspects of using computers: business, websites, algorithms & hardware, and computer animation. In addition, independent study options are available.

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